Sirius Stuff

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What's not perfect with Blogofile

April 28, 2011 at 03:00 PM | categories: Web, User Interface, Blogging | View Comments
In Switched from WordPress to Blogofile there are two good things about using Blogofile:
  • flat files are almost impossible to hack
  • Amazon's S3 (Simple Storage System) can scale incredibly high


There's some downsides:
  • blogofile build seems to copy or regenerate every single file
  • it's not totally happy being on S3 - it doesn't make index.html files for the archive and category directories.
  • there's no easy way to post-via-email or send a link to start a post


Right now I'm writing this with vi and that's far less comfortable than WordPress's editor which I really liked. But I'm sure I'll find TextWrangler or something as suitable for writing blog posts.

Switched from WordPress to Blogofile

April 28, 2011 at 01:24 PM | categories: Web, User Interface | View Comments
I really like WordPress for the huge number of themes and utilities that it has. What I don't like, though, is the need for constant vigilance to make sure that your blog hasn't been hacked. When I started the conversion, I found two blog posts that had been secretly altered so that they had links to spam sites. I wasn't sure whether to be grateful that only two had been altered or disappointed that my blog mattered so little that that's all they did.

So it's with some relief that I've switched to Blogofile, a python program that generates flat files that can be hosted on Amazon's S3 (Simple Storage System). This has the advantage of being almost impossible to hack. It also can scale even if this blog was featured on the front pages of Digg and Reddit and Daring Fireball and Slashdot and ...

Not that that's likely to happen little ol' me but it's comforting to think that everyone in the world could read my incredible prose.

Right now I'm writing this with vi and that's far less comfortable than WordPress's editor which I really liked. But I'm sure I'll find TextWrangler or something as suitable for writing blog posts.

Twitter phishers are after your password

October 29, 2009 at 10:10 AM | categories: Web, User Interface, Twitter | View Comments

I was burned by this one! Graham Cluley writes a nice article on his blog called Twitter phishers are after your password

What was really appalling to me was getting burned by this screen:
Fake twitter login screen
Twitter, like Facebook, lets you use other sites by handling authorization. I’d been having serious problems with Twitter not accepting my password (as were thousands of others, apparently) and it just got fixed last week. So even though I was logged in and active on twitter.com, I wasn’t surprised to be prompted to login. And I didn’t look closely enough at the URL.

Of course I wasn’t surprised to see this:
Fail whale - you've seen this
Takeaways? Twitter has becoming more and more reliable. They are fixing bugs. And we all need to watch where we’re going - sometimes we think we’re someplace we’re not.

images courtesy of Sophos I copied them so they won’t take their bandwidth or disappear if they change their links.


OS X Style Google Reader

June 15, 2007 at 06:06 AM | categories: User Interface | View Comments

I’d referred to using CSS to make Google Reader look better. optimized OS X Style Google Reader If you’re using Google Reader, this makes it much more usable. The font’s better, it’s much prettier in layout, etc., etc. Great stuff.


Official Google Reader Blog - There are people who don’t use feed readers?

May 03, 2007 at 05:05 AM | categories: User Interface | View Comments

Do you use Google Reader? I’ve thought that other readers were better beause they’re faster. I really like RSS Owl, which uses IE to display pages. It’s based on Java and is cross-platform, usable on Macs, Windows and Linux. It uses one file to track what feeds you read. I had been thinking

Problem is, there’s no standard way to show how far you’ve read in a newsfeed. Articles are updated, the online services fetch them at different times - Google and Bloglines are online all the time but your RSS reader probably is not. So I can’t easily keep offline readers in sync unless they’re hooked up to something to like FeedDemon. That costs money, which would be OK, except that they have Mac and Windows (and BlackBerry) but no Linux. Plus I don’t - or want to know - what their licensing scheme is. If I have it on my laptop and my desktop, is that one instance? It’s probably two.

So I made the decision to stick with Google reader which also works on my Blackberry, though not in a great fashion.

I’ve really not been happy with the way that they did “email an article”. But they’ve introduced a new way of doing that and I’m much happier with their implementation. Hmmm. I’d show you a screenshot except that I don’t know how to do that in Linux. I will figure it out.
Official Google Reader Blog: There are people who don’t use feed readers?